missile strike, Biden wants more Ukraine funding, education poll : NPR

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A MARTINEZ, HOST:
Ukrainian officers are calling the newest assault on Kyiv a, quote, “postcard from Russia” and an insult to the United Nations.
STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:
Assaults on Ukraine’s capital had principally stopped till yesterday, after which missiles landed within the coronary heart of the town. Now, why would that be an insult to the United Nations? Whereas the U.N. secretary normal was within the metropolis yesterday. Antonio Guterres was making an attempt to barter humanitarian corridors for civilians in a distinct besieged metropolis.
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ANTONIO GUTERRES: Mariupol is a disaster inside a disaster. Hundreds of civilians want lifesaving help. Many are aged, in want of medical care or have restricted mobility. They want an escape route out of the apocalypse.
MARTINEZ: Becoming a member of us now from the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, is NPR’s Frank Langfitt. Frank, let’s begin with the newest assaults the place you are at, what’s being referred to as a postcard from Russia. What is the scene like there?
FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Nicely, the scene, A – that is an residence constructing that is over 20 tales tall, and the underside three tales had been hit by a cruise missile that got here out of Crimea and knocked out the underside – principally, the underside of this residence constructing. You’ll be able to see the rebar hanging down like strands of hair. And one particular person was killed within the assault, and 9 individuals had been injured. And what’s fascinating, too, A, is that is subsequent to a manufacturing unit that makes missile components but additionally makes vacuum cleaners, of all issues. And it appears to be like to me, so far as I can inform, that this missile missed the manufacturing unit.
MARTINEZ: Missed the manufacturing unit, OK.
LANGFITT: Yeah, so far as I can inform.
MARTINEZ: Wow.
LANGFITT: I imply, it is laborious to see inside, and there does appear to be some harm inside. However so far as we will inform, this missile hit a constructing.
MARTINEZ: The U.N. secretary normal, Frank, stated he was hopeful to determine a humanitarian hall after his assembly with the Russian president earlier this week. What message is Russia sending with this assault?
LANGFITT: Nicely, it is clearly on the very least, not very respectful if in case you have the top of the U.N. right here and also you’re firing a missile inside hours of a press convention that he gave with Volodymyr Zelenskyy. And I suppose I wish to level out, we’re within the heart of the town. This has not been a spot that is been hit that tough. That stated, Zelenskyy’s workplace stated that they’re anticipating at present to get civilians out of the Azovstal metal plant. There are a couple of thousand civilians dwelling in a basement. It is actually a 15-mile maze of bunkers and tunnels. And our colleague Joanna Kakissis has really been in contact with a soldier within the basement there who stated there have been airstrikes yesterday. A makeshift hospital couldn’t sustain. There are 500 wounded fighters, little or no meals, water or medication. After all, with these humanitarian corridors, as we discovered, the problem is the Russians might typically agree however then really find yourself attacking these corridors.
MARTINEZ: You realize, we have been doing this for 3 months now. That is the place we’re at on this level. And you’ve got been speaking to army consultants in Ukraine and elsewhere in your travels in Europe. How do they see this all enjoying out within the coming months?
LANGFITT: Yeah, it is a actually good query. Principally, they see the Russians making an enormous push within the east, within the Donbas area, as we have been speaking about, attempt to take management of a lot of the south and attempt to maintain what individuals see as sham referenda to principally argue that these territories that they are taking are not part of Ukraine however impartial or pro-Russian, get as a lot territory as doable, successfully, to take what has been a failed army operation up till now, present it again residence as some type of a victory. Now, Ukrainians, after all, they will use all these enormous armaments that they are getting from the U.S. and NATO allies to carry as a lot floor as doable. No one expects a negotiated resolution any time quickly. I used to be speaking to Oleg Ignatov. He is with the Worldwide Disaster Group. That is how he put it.
OLEG IGNATOV: They do not know methods to cease this battle proper now as a result of each side nonetheless hope that they’ll or will be capable of win this battle.
LANGFITT: And naturally, there are going to be increasingly more weapons coming, maybe for years, from NATO.
MARTINEZ: That is NPR’s Frank Langfitt in Ukraine’s capital metropolis of Kyiv. Frank, thanks.
LANGFITT: Good to speak, A.
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MARTINEZ: All proper, President Biden is urging lawmakers to ship extra money to Ukraine.
INSKEEP: He’d like the US to ship $33 billion on prime of billions already despatched.
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PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: So we have to contribute arms, funding, ammunition and the financial help to make their braveness and sacrifice have function, to allow them to proceed this battle and do what they’re doing. It is vital this funding will get accredited and accredited as shortly as doable.
INSKEEP: Simply by the use of comparability, your entire annual Russian army price range, the price range for all of Russia, is regarded as round $65 billion. If Biden’s request is accredited, the US may have despatched a complete of 47 billion to Ukraine in only a few months.
MARTINEZ: NPR White Home correspondent Asma Khalid has been following this improvement. The president has requested for $33 billion. What does that embrace?
ASMA KHALID, BYLINE: Nicely, a bulk of it, roughly $20 billion, is safety help. That features issues like ammunition, armored autos and unmanned plane techniques. A number of the cash can also be geared towards serving to clear landmines and different explosive remnants that Russians have left behind. Many of the remaining $13 billion goes to be divided up between financial help and humanitarian help – , issues like medical tools and secure consuming water.
MARTINEZ: All proper, so President Biden has now settled on what he thinks is required. What’s been the response to date?
KHALID: You realize, properly, in the end Congress has to agree to those funds. Our colleague Kelsey Snell, who covers Congress, says her preliminary learn from Senate Republicans is that they don’t seem to be, in idea, against the greenback quantity, however they do have some questions. Senator Joni Ernst from Iowa is a kind of Republicans.
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JONI ERNST: Common prime line is necessary, however I wish to know the satan within the particulars. Now we have to ensure we’re offering them what they’re asking for, what they really want and might use.
KHALID: You realize, broadly, I’ll say, thus far, there appears to be bipartisan help in Congress for Ukraine, however it does appear to be any closing invoice will take some negotiation, and Kelsey tells me that might take some weeks.
MARTINEZ: All proper, so $33 billion feels like loads, however within the huge image, is that sufficient cash for Ukraine?
KHALID: You realize, the White Home anticipates that this cash, the $33 billion, might final Ukraine about 5 months. However, , to your query – is it sufficient? – consultants I spoke with stated it is actually laborious to inform. It relies upon partly how the battle performs out. Liam Collins is a retired U.S. Military colonel who helped advise Ukraine’s Protection Division from 2016 to 2018.
LIAM COLLINS: I believe the U.S. has achieved a fairly good job of serving to out Ukraine by way of what they want. The tempo of help has been adequate. However it is going to must – , it is going to must go on for a very long time, and folks should not get drained after a pair months.
KHALID: You realize, as you heard him say, no one actually is aware of how lengthy this battle might go on – months, presumably even years. And a key query is whether or not there’ll proceed to be bipartisan help from the American public. Consultants additionally inform me, , there’s a sense of urgency. If negotiations in Congress take weeks, that might show perilous for Ukraine. I did ask the administration if there’s any approach to, say, present a line of credit score, transfer a few of this cash to Ukraine ASAP after which pay it again. I used to be advised that is not an possibility. Congress does must approve these funds as a way to hold assist flowing to Ukraine. I’ll say, , I count on us to listen to extra about this subsequent week. The president is touring to Alabama to go to a Lockheed Martin plant that makes Javelins, and I am certain that that is going to be a part of his pitch.
MARTINEZ: NPR’s Asma Khalid. Thanks loads.
KHALID: Glad to do it.
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MARTINEZ: The tales that put faculties within the information might not replicate the issues of fogeys with children at school.
INSKEEP: Plenty of dialogue about faculties facilities on tradition battle political points, like educating racism or discussing gender. However a nationwide ballot by NPR and Ipsos out at present finds that these points aren’t the primary issues for many mother and father of school-age children. A big majority of fogeys reported being pleased with their youngsters’s faculties and what’s being taught there.
MARTINEZ: Anya Kamenetz from NPR’s Schooling desk is right here to inform us all in regards to the outcomes. So what are mother and father saying about faculties?
ANYA KAMENETZ, BYLINE: Yeah, so this ballot follows up on one which NPR commissioned a yr in the past from Ipsos about how the pandemic is continuous to have an effect on the nation’s college students. And we discovered some actual brilliant spots, as we hold getting back from the worst of the pandemic, and there is additionally a number of curveballs right here. So on the nice facet, in comparison with 2021, extra mother and father are saying their little one is forward at school, and fewer say they’re behind, and that is true whether or not we requested about math, studying or social abilities, psychological well being and improvement. In reality, a rising quantity, nearly half of fogeys agree with the assertion – the pandemic has not disrupted my kid’s schooling in any respect.
MARTINEZ: In order that sounds actually encouraging, although is there any reality to that?
KAMENETZ: You realize, I ought to say that this rosy view is a bit at odds with what we all know from take a look at scores and attendance. Plenty of youngsters do have studying to atone for. Nonetheless, this type of pondering is according to an entire lot of polling that goes again many years. Dad and mom do have a tendency to precise concern about schooling as an summary difficulty, however once you zoom in nearer, they’re pleased with their very own children’ faculty and, much more so, their children’ academics. So in our ballot, 88% stated, my children’ academics did the very best they might through the pandemic, given the circumstances. And greater than 4 out of 5 stated, my children’ faculty has really dealt with the pandemic properly.
MARTINEZ: Wow. Now, Republican governors like Ron DeSantis of Florida, Glenn Youngkin in Virginia, they’ve turned mother and father’ rights into a significant political speaking level. Did your ballot discover lots of curiosity in that?
KAMENETZ: Probably not, no. So greater than three-quarters of respondents agreed – my kid’s faculty does a superb job protecting me knowledgeable in regards to the curriculum, together with probably controversial subjects. We requested about gender and sexuality, race, U.S. historical past, patriotism, and in every of these instances, it was fewer than 1 in 5 mother and father who advised us, yeah, I am involved; the college’s educating these subjects in a method that’s not in keeping with my household’s values. And a a lot bigger group, about 1 in 3 in every case stated they did not know. In different phrases, possibly not lots of detailed conversations happening about this on the dinner desk.
MARTINEZ: What in regards to the partisan divides? I imply, are these controversies one thing that Republican mother and father possibly are notably involved about?
KAMENETZ: So we did hear from mother and father like Christine in Wisconsin. She requested to not use her final title as a result of she says she’s afraid of her youngsters being retaliated in opposition to.
CHRISTINE: You realize, there have been snarky feedback about white privilege.
KAMENETZ: She additionally does not approve of her son, who’s in highschool, being requested issues like…
CHRISTINE: What pronouns do you favor to make use of to confer with your self?
KAMENETZ: However the truth is – and the pollsters had been shocked by this – there have been really few partisan divides in our ballot. Most mother and father are happy, most really feel well-informed. And the small group of fogeys who had been sad with how their faculty’s tackling racism and U.S. historical past, these had been simply as more likely to establish as Democrats as Republicans. In different phrases, for each mother or father who thinks their kid’s faculty is simply too, quote, unquote, “woke,” there could also be one who thinks it is not woke sufficient.
JIM ONDELACY: They type of whitewash the best way that historical past is taught to their children.
KAMENETZ: In order that’s Jim Ondelacy. He is a Native American and a Democrat who lives close to Fort Price, Texas. And he’s one who needs his son’s highschool went extra in depth and taught extra in regards to the nation’s historical past of racism and oppression.
MARTINEZ: NPR’s Anya Kamenetz. Thanks loads.
KAMENETZ: Thanks.

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